August 13, 2013

I find myself back on the East Side again. This trip was sort of by happenstance, but none the less a nice hike. The Saddlebag Lakes area is as good a place as any to use as a launch pad for trips into and around Yosemite and although it can be busy during the peak season, it’s nowhere near the…

Read the PostSaddlebag and Beyond

July 22, 2013

The Eastern Side of the Sierras (almost Yosemite in this case), especially anywhere around 9500 feet and above are quite a treat to explore and have a great feeling of desolation. The scenery ranges from stark, high peaks to, talus slopes, down into grassy meadows and of course those beautiful Sierra lakes. The Saddlebag Lake Loop is no exception, but…

Read the PostWay Out There, Not So Far Away

March 5, 2013

For those of us who only get to visit the desert, it can be such a foreign and mystical place. It’s hard to compare to being in the Sierras, even spending time above tree line is not the same experience. Of the few desert areas I’ve visited, Joshua Tree has got to be one of the more interesting. The expansive…

Read the PostLSD at Joshua Tree

February 1, 2013

Henry Coe State Park is a place that many, including myself, have a tough love relationship with. It’s a vast expanse of hills, creeks, and small lakes punctuated by poetic Oaks and mythical giant Madrones. In the cool months the rolling green hills go on and on, and if your legs could do the same, you might even be able…

Read the PostTrails, Turkeys, and Telescopes

January 28, 2013

Back in 2011 I shared some thoughts on first aid for backpacking along with the kit that I carry. This kit is designed for ‘typical’ backpacking trips where treating minor injuries and discomfort can be common. It’s not really for the folks with WFA or WFR certs who may elect, or even feel a responsibility to carry items to treat…

Read the PostRevisited – A Lightweight First Aid Kit for Backpacking

January 18, 2013

Fresh snowfall beckons those who snowshoe and cross country ski to come explore the Yosemite landscape in its winter majesty. Iconic scenery is familiar and yet different under a blanket of snow. The hiking (or skiing) to Dewey Point is easy going and non-technical. This is a trip that anyone can do. For winter camping, an understanding of fundamental gear…

Read the PostSubzero Chill and Iconic Views

May 29, 2012

The Lost Coast really does live up to its name. The place itself seems as if it could vanish from the Earthly plane when the fog blows in just right, which it often does. It sits so far to the North end of the state that it’s a haul to get to, regardless of where someone is coming from. My…

Read the PostFear on the Lost Coast

April 1, 2012

It’s April 1st, so it only seemed fitting to post some nonsense, but regardless of the date significance, the timing just seemed right. I have a five year old and preschooler on spring break and the flu virus has visited me to thwart my plans henceforth, striking both kids in a timely manner as well. As the dust from this…

Read the PostUrban Decay at Mare Island

September 8, 2011

The plan: see as much of the park as possible without over-doing the hiking. This route meanders through grassy meadows, along creeks (and through them), past water falls, through pine forests, among steaming pits of molten sulfur, across volcanic lava beds and scree, over the top of a cinder cone, and past many lakes. In the United States there is…

Read the PostVolcano Hopping!

August 15, 2011

If we were playing $20,000 Dollar Pyramid and the answer was “The Bay Area”, someone might shout out some clues like “Uber expensive town homes, Silicon Valley, traffic congestion!!”, and if they were really awesome maybe even “The Ohlone Wilderness Trail!”. Wilderness in the Bay Area is a bit of an anomaly, but if you know where to look you…

Read the PostAll Ohlone in the Bay Area